Candidates for PASP Officers

They bravely accepted the nominations to be PASP Officers for 2018 - 2019.  Know your candidates by clicking on their pictures or names.

Howell Henrian G. Bayona, CSP-PASP
 PASP Member since 2013


Howell is a practicing speech pathologist at St. Luke’s Medical Center Global City’s Voice, Swallowing, & Sinus Center, and Memory Center.  He is also a Clinical Instructor at the College of Allied Medical Professions, University of the Philippines – Manila.

He graduated cum laude on 2012 for his BS Speech Pathology degree from the University of the Philippines Manila.  He then took a postgraduate certification course in dysphagia from June to October 2013.  He is currently taking his Master of Science degree in Clinical Epidemiology under the College of Medicine, UP Manila.

Howell has done several research work, with the most recent being an ongoing study on the clinical, radiologic and genetic profiles of Filipino familial frontotemporal dementia. He has done investigative work on the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on fluent aphasia, clinical outcomes of cognitive behavioral therapy and speech therapy with Cerebrolysin, acoustic parameters of perceptually normal voice production in Filipinos, and interaction patterns and language teaching strategies in Filipino parent-toddler dyads.  He was the primary investigator of the adaptation of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination—Short Form in Filipino, the poster of which he had presented in Munich, Germany in 2016.  He also was a research assistant for Dr. Joyce Marzan’s dissertation on the spoken language of young Filipino children.

If elected, Howell aims to address the current issues on poor awareness of and access to SLP services of most Filipinos, poor research culture, lack of clinical practice standards and guidelines, and reduced membership engagement.  


Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

I have lots of aspirations for and frustrations about this field. And since there were some people who nominated me because they think I’ll be able to contribute, I thought I might give it a go.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

I have this tendency to always look for ways to improve something or think of solutions to problems. Also, I have a clear vision that I want to share as well as goals and strategies that could be used to meet that vision.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

 
 ISSUES PLAN OF ACTION 
1.  Limited public awareness of and access to SLP services
  • Most Filipinos (i.e. general public, health institutions, etc.) are still not fully aware of the nature and significance of speech therapy services, especially in communities where even access to basic or specialized diagnostic services is challenging.
  • These difficulties in service provision further adds to the already high burden associated with communication or swallowing disorders.
Increase PASP’s involvement in activities related to health policy formulation.
  • Involves identifying government institutions (e.g. DOH, DOST), NGOs, or other organizations that PASP can establish strategic linkages/partnerships with
  • Providing continuing education/capacity-building activities related to health policy for interested members 
2.  Poor research culture
  • Developing a culture of research is a broad concept that entails creating a structure or a supportive context that would allow the practitioners to understand, value, use, and produce research. Without this culture of research, it will be difficult to develop the science and practice of speech pathology in the Philippines. Poor science would lead to suboptimal quality of services, which would then make it difficult for financing institutions or policy-makers to justify any recommendations related to provision of SP services. 
1.  Creating a 10-year research agenda
  • Involves clear articulation of shared goals that could guide the process of identifying priority/urgent research projects and allocation of resources/funds
  • May be communicated or developed together with representatives from higher-education institutions (HEIs) offering SLP programs to encourage research outputs that could respond to the needs of the discipline
2.    Creating specialty groups (e.g. fluency group, dysphagia group)
  • These groups may also provide members the chance to formally network together with other members (including those who practice overseas) who share the same interests, and to have opportunities to enhance their clinical skills, share resources, mentor/be mentored, and practice participative governance.
  • Specialty groups can then be tapped to identify their preferred continuing education activities, or to serve as contributors for creating practice policy documents related to their area of practice
  • Since most members work as clinicians, most of them would most likely be interested and engaged in such activities 
3.  Lack of clinical practice standards and guidelines
  • There appears to be significant variability among SLPs with regard to how they do their practice
  • As the number of practitioners (legitimate and illegitimate alike) continue to grow over the next few years, policy documents would be vital to assist practitioners in making clinical decisions. If communicated well, these also guide policy-makers and other stakeholders (e.g. healthcare providers, patients, general public) in determining how to make therapy services or information about them more accurate and accessible
1.    Drafting clinical practice standards or guidelines for each of the areas of practice
  • Practice standards or CPGs are policy documents containing recommended practices in a particular area of practice (e.g. dysphagia, pediatric language, etc) developed through a systematic review of the best available evidence and analysis of possible care options most appropriate for the setting or circumstances.
  • These could (1) ensure that each SLP (regardless of geographical location, training, or licensure exam performance) would provide services consistent with what is considered ‘best’ practice; (2) increase clients’ awareness of SLP services and protect them from misinformation; (3) be used as references by policy-making institutions
  • Since these documents require time, manpower, and certain competencies (e.g. critical appraisal of evidence), appropriate capacity-building/continuing education projects and funding would be provided. 


If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

I guess it depends on what the group agrees on.


If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

Yes, there might be some situations. My schedule in graduate school and workload may occasionally prevent me from attending certain meetings if both are happening at the same time/date.


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Lorenzo Mari S. Bueza, CSP-PASP
 PASP Member since 2015


Lorenzo received his Bachelor of Science in Speech Pathology degree from the University of the Philippines Manila in 2015.  He is a PROMPT-trained speech and language pathologist presently practicing at Trails Center for Children, Inc. in Laguna, Therabilities Inc. in Mandaluyong City, and at the Mandaluyong Center for Alternative and Rehabilitation Services (C.A.R.E.S.) – Project Therapy, Evaluation, and Assimilation of Children with Handicap (T.E.A.C.H.) where he also does clinical supervision of student clinicians. 

He received the 2015 Outstanding Student Leader Award from UP–College of Allied Medical Professions and was the 2017 Interns’ Choice for Best Clinical Supervisor from the Department of Speech-Language Pathology, College of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Santo Tomas.

On top of his clinical work, he is a Financial Advisor of PruLife U.K. where he handles financial consultancy and provides financial services to clients as an independent contractor of the company. 

For Lorenzo, being a speech pathologist does not only entail being inside the clinics but also by being proactive and involved in resolving issues that currently concern the profession such as the Speech Pathology bill. He sees himself to be ready in taking a more active role in PASP’s advocacies and hopes to inspire SLP students and professionals alike to also do so.

 

Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

Being a Speech Pathologist does not only entail being inside clinics, but also being engaged in a proactive manner. This proactiveness would allow being involved in issues that currently concern the profession. Being a student leader in college, I had the privilege of getting to know more about the issues of the profession in a deeper sense. Issues such as the SP Bill, as well as the limitations of the SP population surely had an impact also on us before. Now that I am working as a professional, I am more than interested to take a more active role in being more engaged in the organization’s advocacies I also hope that would also inspire SLP students and professionals alike to take a more active role in such advocacies.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

Being a member of numerous organizations before, I can say that I have experience in handling and organizing projects that catered to specific objectives and advocacies. Furthermore, being able to organize such events allowed me to hone my skills in public relations and as well as getting hands-on in different aspects of the project (i.e. publicity, internal organization of events/projects, among others).


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

First and foremost, the SP Bill is one of the most pressing issues that we currently face as an organization. Being self-regulated, the organization does not have a legal and legislative backbone in addressing concerns such as pseudo-professionals, unethical practices, and even access of SLP services to Filipinos. If elected, there would be a continuous push for the passage of the bill. More important than that, the organization must also have projects that should cater in bolstering support from all sectors in pushing for the passage of the bill.

As a previous student officer in charge of handling events that cater to fostering camaraderie among students, one of the issues I saw was the lack of their engagement in the organization. This connection is important as the organization needs to increase awareness and promote connections between the students and the professionals. If ever I get the chance to serve in the organization, systems can be set in place in bridging and strengthening our presence in the youth and students. One, establishing projects that cater to students can be done in order to increase awareness about the PASP and the profession. Two, events and seminars that can include students must be made more accessible for them (through incentives, discounts, etc.). And third, if possible, there should be a push for institutionalizing a network initiated by the students and supervised by the professional organization.

 

If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

  • Foster more active engagement across different sectors of the profession.
  • Monitor implementation of SLP-related laws (i.e. SP Bill).
  • Include more professionals in seminars and conventions related to the advancement of the profession.
  • Bridge the students towards activities and advocacies of the organization, as well as make such undertakings more accessible to the students.
  • Institutionalize systems that would cater to students and increase presence of the organization to future professionals.


If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

No.


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Kara Unso-Cooling, CSP-PASP
 PASP Member since 2010


Kara is currently a specialized learning support specialist and a speech-language pathologist at the International School Manila.  She has worked at several institutions, namely, One World School in Makati City as an SLP and an IEP teacher; Leapfrogs in Singapore as an SLP; The Beacon School in Taguig City as an educational assistant; Center for GOALS Therapy Center in Global City, Fort Bonifacio as an SLP; Alternative Learning Resource School – Philippines in Quezon City as an SLP consultant; and UP Manila as a clinical supervisor for the interns for pediatric patients.

Kara received her Bachelor of Science in Speech Pathology degree at the University of the Philippines Manila in April 2010.  She is a candidate for a Masters in Education, Major in Early Childhood Education in De La Salle University, Manila.  She received her post-graduate certification in Education – Early Years Programme Distance Learning from the University of Sunderland, United Kingdom on June 2017.

She has attended several trainings and seminars to further hone her skills and knowledge as an SLP.  She is a certified practitioner of PROMPT® Level 1, Hanen: It Takes Two to Talk®, and Level 1 Talk Tools.

Kara is interested in serving as a PASP officer as she has seen how the association has focused on promoting and strengthening the profession in the Philippines, and thus would like to do the same. She strongly believes in advocating for practitioners to engage in meaningful and consistent collaboration with other professionals especially in the school setting. 


Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

I have seen how devoted PASP has been in promoting and strengthening the field of speech pathology in the Philippines, and I would like to do the same.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

My strongest trait is that I am collaborative. I work well with parents, teachers, colleagues and other professionals at work and outside of work.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

I always knew that I wanted to work in a school set up. The reason for this is that upon graduating, I realized that in my clinical set up, the kids are performing well with me, however, this is not necessarily transferred in school.

I am passionate about the importance of meaningful and consistent collaboration with parents, teachers and other professionals. I am an advocate for therapists especially, to reach out to teachers and work closely with them so that skills learned in one-on-one sessions are generalized in school.

Scheduling may be hard at times, and in cases like this, advancements in technology come in handy as it offers other avenues for collaboration (Of course face to face interaction is priority). Another action to achieve this meaningful and consistent collaboration is to start doing it during internship, specifically where interns may have to reach out to teachers in one point or another to either set goals, be part of parent-teacher conferences, or work on activities that can be done in school or vice versa.


If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

  • Free screening/ goal setting for children in public schools or non-profit organizations.
  • Equip therapists with current trends in the different curricula in schools to open doors for a curriculum based therapy approach (as needed) 


If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

Yes. I work full time in a school and during school breaks, I usually am out of the country, specifically in June-July (Summer holiday) where I am in the UK to visit my husband’s relatives. During February to April, I coach track and field till late and may have trouble attending weekday meetings during this time. Other than some time constraints (which when elected I will let people know beforehand) I do not see any problems in terms of fulfilling responsibilities assigned to me.


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Elinor Cunanan-Bautista, CSP-PASP
PASP Member since 1997


Elinor is a practicing speech-language pathologist at Primary Skills Foundation in Quezon City where she had been seeing clients since 2002.  She is also currently a special lecturer at the University of the Philippines Manila. 

She completed her Bachelor of Science degree in Speech Pathology from the University of the Philippines Manila in 1997.  She further honed her skills as an educator by taking units in Master of Arts in Education from 2000-2002 at the University of the Philippines Diliman.  She also took units in Master of Rehabilitation Science - Speech Pathology from 2004-2005, also at the University of the Philippines - Manila.

She continues to improve herself professionally by attending numerous seminars and training such as Social Thinking by Michelle Garcia Winner and Speech Sound Disorders by Caroline Bowen among many others.  She is also a PROMPT® Level 2 practitioner. 

Elinor aims to contribute in the furtherance of ethical practice, continuing education, and quality of speech pathology practice.  She plans to do this through monitoring of therapy centers where speech pathologists work, taking surveys of what members need in terms of continuing education, and investigating pseudo-speech pathologists in an effort to uphold the quality of services provided to our clients.  


Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

I’m interested to serve PASP because I want to contribute in the furtherance of ethical practice, continuing education, and quality of the speech pathology practice.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

My dedication and passion to my 20-year practice as a speech pathologist is my strongest trait.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

The current issues I am passionate about include:

  • Ethical practice
  • Continuing education
  • Quality of service (assessment, intervention)

 Possible plan of actions are as follows:

  • Monitoring of therapy centers where speech pathologists work
  • Taking surveys of what members need in terms of continuing education
  • Investigating pseudo-speech pathologists in an effort to uphold our profession and quality of services provided to our clients


If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

  • To assemble varied seminars and trainings for the members
  • To standardize/uphold the quality of assessment and intervention services.
  • To promote ethical and conscientious practice. 


If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

Yes. Should meetings coincide with my children’s school activities or scheduled family affair, I might not be able to attend certain meetings.

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Mary Ann Gisselle O. Esguerra, CSP-PASP
PASP Member since 2015


Mary Ann Gisselle is a practicing speech-language pathologist from Laguna.  Her centers of affiliation include Trails Center for Children, Inc. in Laguna; Asian Hospital and Medical Center in Muntinlupa City; and Integrated Movement Academy in Las Piñas City. 

Gisselle received her bachelor’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology from the University of Santo Tomas, graduating cum laude in 2015. As a student, she was a consistent dean’s lister; and was her batch’s 3rd outstanding SLP intern and salutatorian.

Although relatively new in the profession, Giselle has already sought various seminars and other continuing education activities ever since she graduated to develop her knowledge and skills as a speech-language pathologist. 

Gisselle understands that being a PASP officer would entail hard work, but she expresses her readiness to accept the challenge of serving the association. She draws inspiration from the current president of the association and hopes to follow her example and devote her energy, time, and talent to the association as a way to pay it forward.

 

Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

Working with a boss, who unselfishly served and led the organization, I feel that I am called to also walk the path she took, with my own steps, energy time and talent. I personally know that this officership would entail a lot of hard work, missed family gatherings, and whole lot more, but I want to extend myself to be of service to the association, my colleagues and the profession to pay it forward and show my gratitude through dedicating my time, talent and effort through this. More so, I want to challenge my professional growth by being able to lead and serve. I know myself as a good member, whom if given the task would do my best to fulfill it, now I challenge myself to be part of the team who would now lead and spearhead projects and tasks for the enhancement of the profession. Before I think, I can't do that, so now I take this as a challenge to myself to prove that I can.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

Sense of responsibility. Perseverance. Passion.

I believe I said three, but these, I think, work hand in hand with one another. I am a go-getter type of person. I am determined to always strive for excellence, and outstanding service for the association and the profession, in this case. Given a task, I make myself accountable and responsible to achieving it. I put my heart in my I do and I entrust Him in making all of these, God-willing.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

1.  Regulation of SLP Practice through the SP Bill/Law

If still not passed into a law

  • Continue lobbying for the bill to become a law, if not yet passed during the current term
  • Collaborating and reaching out to members for their regular renewal of memberships; non-members and new graduates to apply for membership

Once approved into a law

  • Helping in the implementation of SP Law
  • Updating the members of the requirements to be Registered Speech and Language Pathologists
  • Tracking and updating certified members who are qualified to become Registered Speech and Language Pathologists

2.  SLP Boards, when passed into a law

  • Collaborating with the PRC to refer out SLPs who can help in the formation of the Board
  • Creating and updating a lists of speech language pathologists with different specializations to help in the formation of the boards

3.  Advocating rights of people with special needs

4.  Marketing of service to eradicate pseudo-practice

  • Updates on SLPs who are certified
  • Marketing therapy centers and other facilities which offer legitimate speech therapy services

5.  Awareness and involvement of members to PASP-related activities

  • Being active in social media and other platforms to listen, hear and be a voice of my colleagues.
  • Reach out to young SLPs and help them in their first few years of practice. Seek advice to older members that would help starting professionals, thus creating a more harmonious relationship amongst the members

6.  Collaboration with NGOs and Government agencies (ASP, DSAPI, PSA, Operation Smile, etc.) related to individuals with special needs and disability

7.  Volunteer work for less-fortunate clients needing SLP service through taking part and collaborating with existing projects of LGUs, NGOs and Government agencies

8.  Evidence-based practice

  • Registering and subscribing to international journals and publications, which the members can have access to


If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

  • To pass and legalize SLP law (if still pending by the time we start our term)
  • To implement SLP law to regulate professional practice of speech-language pathology practice in the Philippines
  • To successfully spearhead and organize the PASP’s second international convention
  • To conduct and hold more seminar and workshops that would help in the professionals’ advancement
  • To promote evidence-based practice through subscribing to journals, which are available to PASP members
  • To promote awareness and active involvement of members to PASP-related activities


If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

If given the chance to be elected, rest assured that I would allot time and effort to attend and take part in the organizations activities from planning to execution. I would organize and put association-related duties as one of my priorities. However, given that I may not be able to attend due to unforeseen circumstances, I would make use of technology (i.e. Viber, Google Hangouts, Facetime, Skype) to still attend and take part in meetings and other gatherings.


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Jessamae L. Fadri, CSP-PASP
PASP Member since 2013


Jessamae received her degree in BS Speech Pathology from the University of the Philippines, Manila–College of Allied Medical Professions in 2012. She is currently the section chief of the Speech Pathology Division, Veterans Memorial Medical Center where she had been providing her service since April 2014.  She is also a clinical supervisor at this institution.

To further develop herself professionally as a clinician and a clinical supervisor, Jessamae has attended several seminars and trainings such as Social Thinking by Michelle Garcia-Winner, NMES and sEMG in Dysphagia Management by Teresa Biber Lomonte, and Developing Outcomes and Content in Outcomes-Based Clinical Education hosted by University of Santo Tomas. Furthermore, she took graduate units in Dysphagia and Clinical Teaching in UP CAMP in 2016.

On top of her practice as a speech—language pathologist, Jessamae is also a youth leader in her church’s youth ministry.

Jessamae hopes to assist colleagues and to contribute to improving the quality of service that SLPs give to clients and their families if given the chance to become a PASP officer. She also expressed her belief that this role will help her better understand the profession and the practice in the country.


Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

I am interested to be a PASP officer because I would like to serve my fellow SLPs and to further contribute in improving the quality of service that will be given to our patients and their families. Also, being in the field for 5 years, I would also like to take on a different role, aside from being a clinician and a clinical supervisor. I believe that by taking this step, it would help me to better understand our profession and practice in our country.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

I believe that my strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession is that I am fully committed to do my responsibilities and to serve others. When given a task, I give my time and effort to it, and make sure that I finish it, not just for the sake of finishing but be able to complete it excellently. I am also committed in serving others and willing to go extra mile, which I believe is very important as an officer, as it involves serving my fellow SLPs as well as the patients and families who are in need of our service.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

Since I’ve been practicing in a hospital setting, particularly in the adult and geriatric practice, I have been passionate about increasing the community’s awareness of our role in the management of cases that involve speech, language and swallowing disorders in the adult population. I would like to help in disseminating information in the hospitals and community about our role and the different disorders in the adult and geriatric population, and hopefully help in improving the collaboration with different disciplines to improve the quality of management given to our patients. Also, I hope to help in establishing and continuing support groups for our adult patients and their families as this is a need that I see that may be addressed.


If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

  • To increase the community’s awareness and knowledge regarding our role in the management of speech, language and swallowing cases in the adult population and hospital setting.
  • To improve the collaboration between SLPs and other professions to improve quality of service given to our clients.
  • To further promote the SLPs and our role in the school and hospital settings.
  • To establish support group/s that may help our clients and their families.


If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

So far, none.


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Johanna Joy F. Gomez, CSP-PASP
PASP Member since 2010


Johanna Joy is currently the clinic director and owner of The Therapy Room Evaluation and Intervention Services, Inc. in Biñan, Laguna.  She is also a consultant speech-language pathologist and clinical supervisor in Trails Center for Children in San Pedro, Laguna.   

Johanna Joy completed her BS Speech Pathology degree from the University of the Philippines Manila in 2008.  As a student at UP Manila, she was a college scholar for four semesters and was a dean’s lister for a semester. 

She has attended several seminars and trainings to further develop her knowledge and skills as a speech – language pathologist. She is a PROMPT® Level 1 practitioner and she recently received an Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) specialist certificate via the Tinig-AAC Project and the College of Allied Medical Professions–University of the Philippines Manila.

Johanna Joy is interested to become a PASP officer as she aims to serve in the profession that she loves.  She expressed that the profession had been good to her in terms of personal and professional growth and believes that it is time for her to give back.  Education and awareness of speech pathology services are issues that she would like to work on if elected.  


Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

Simply because I want to be able to serve in the profession that I love. The profession has been so good to me, in terms of personal and professional growth, and I think now is a good time to give back. Also, because I am always pursuing growth, being a PASP officer could be a great opportunity to further enhance my leadership skills.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

Having experience as a Speech Pathologist for 9 years, being an administrator in my own therapy center (The Therapy Room), and being Trails San Pedro’s Speech Pathology Internship Coordinator have helped me become more organized and productive. I feel that these traits would benefit the association in achieving PASP’s goals.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

Education and awareness of Speech Pathology services still remain as a pressing issue after all these years. Having worked in the province and in a hospital setting, I have met families and professionals who are still uncertain of what we actually do and how we can help them. Continuing interprofessional meetings, seminars, and training for families and other professional would still be appropriate to be done to disseminate information about our profession.


If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

  • To increase awareness of Speech Pathology and its services in the provinces and other settings needing education.
  • To increase the number of members joining the association.
  • To be regulated by the government (PRC) as professionals.

If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

Yes. I am fully aware and I accept that if I become an officer, that would entail that I have to attend meetings and accomplish tasks for PASP. While I am ready for that, there might be instances where there would be a possibility that I would not be able to physically attend meetings especially if meetings are held in the far end of Metro Manila, because I live in Laguna. Nevertheless, I will still do my tasks and responsibilities with the best of my ability.


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Pauline D.C. Janiola, CSP-PASP
PASP Member since 2015


Pauline received her BS Speech Pathology degree from the University of the Philippines Manila in 2015.  She experienced leadership roles as the president of CAMP Synergy, a student organization, in 2013-2104.  She was also the Chairperson for the Publicity Committee of the Collegiate Association of Speech Pathologists (CASP) in 2013-2014 and was a member of the CAMP Volunteer Corps from 2011-2104.

She is currently a consultant speech-language pathologist at Communicare Therapy Center for Children in Parañaque City, Helping Hands Pediatric Therapy Center of Batangas in Batangas City, and the Mary Mediatrix Medical Center in Lipa City, Batangas.  Pauline handles pediatric and adult/geriatric cases in these centers. She is also a PROMPT® level 1 trained practitioner.

Pauline sees heightened public awareness (of the profession) as well as the passage of professional regulation laws for Filipino SLPs as part of the solution towards legitimizing speech-language services in the country.  She also recognizes the importance for continuing education and inter-professional collaboration in the PASP’s growth as an organization.


Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

I want to serve my fellow SLPs in the Philippines through protecting, promoting and advancing the speech-language pathology profession in the country. I also want to see the association to grow more, and reach out to more SLPs in the country. I also want to be of more help to SLPs who have issues with their practice through being a bridge between them and PASP.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

I think that my drive to get things done efficiently, and passion for the profession will benefit the association and the whole SLP community. Being a person who values time spent in doing tasks, I take tasks seriously and get them done as soon as I can. Likewise, I think that my passion for the profession manifests in my willingness to protect it, and hone it to be more recognized and acknowledged.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

Currently, I am passionate about the regulation of the profession as being a provincial practitioner. I have had personal encounters with individuals posing as legitimate SLPs, and clients willing to avail their services while waiting for a certified SLP to come along. I also see continuing education opportunities as something that the body can improve more on.

In order to address the issue of regulation, I propose that we target the root cause of why there is an abundance of pseudo-SLPs, which is lack of practitioners. To achieve a higher level of awareness, I believe that PASP has the means to work with schools to conduct career orientations hence, prompting more students to research and hopefully, apply for SLP programs. Once universities and colleges recognize that there is a clamor for the profession, they would work with CHED to develop the program in their respective institutions.

 Regarding the limited opportunities for continuing education, I believe that we could do more in inspiring current practitioners to go out of their comfort zones and register for continuing education opportunities. After all, the issue does not exist in a one-way track, both PASP and its members have to work together to bring seminars, and certificate courses to the country. If there is a seminar presented, sign up. If there are requests for a course, then we must endeavor to bring it to the country.

 

If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

If I am elected as a PASP officer, I want our team to achieve the following at the end of our term:

  • Provide at least one continuing education opportunity focusing on the different areas that SLPs work on: Language, Hearing, AAC, Oromotor/Articulation, Adult language, Dysarthria, Dysphagia, and etc.
  • Cement the status of Speech – Language Pathology as a profession regulated and recognized by the government and the country.
  • Work with other professionals (i.e., OTs, PTs, and MDs) in spreading awareness, and being vigilant about the existence of pseudo-SLPs.
  • Establish an ethics code for the practice of Speech-Language Pathology in the Philippines.
  • Develop a mobile app version of current PASP website for easier access.
  • Establish “regional chapters” to help SLPs identify and refer to each other.

If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

Yes. I have always been a sickly person (I used to get sick at least once a month prior to availing peroxide therapy last year) but I am currently working on establishing a healthy lifestyle.


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Jonah Jerome P. Katalbas, CSP-PASP
PASP Member since 2010


Jay graduated with a BS Speech Pathology degree from the University of the Philippines Manila in 2008.  He is an active faculty member of the Department of Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Santo Tomas College of Rehabilitation Sciences (CRS) where he also serves as the Chair of the CRS Search and Rescue Committee and as Co-adviser for the Red Cross Youth Council.  He is also a member of the CRS Outcomes Based Education support group.

Commitments as a practicing speech-language pathologist regularly take him to the Community General Hospital in San Pablo City, Laguna and to the Dr. Arturo P. Pingoy Medical Center in Koronadal City, South Cotabato as a speech-language pathology consultant.

At the moment, Jay is pursuing his Masters in Health Professions Education degree at the National Teacher Training Center for the Health Professions in UP Manila.

He currently holds the position of Membership Committee Chair of the PASP where he hopes to continue serving by pushing for active membership in the association for all Filipino speech pathologists to enhance professional collaboration and to strengthen support for the Speech Pathology Act.  Jay also envisions the PASP establishing special interest groups for different areas of practice and maybe establish a Philippine Journal of Speech-Language Pathology as a venue for publishing local research.


Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

It is with great passion that I want to continue the work of PASP in inviting and uniting the members through the streamlined membership application process and continuing education activities that the current board of officers have set.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

My efficiency and decisiveness in tasks would be a great asset to the association especially when it comes to membership matters.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

 It has been always my belief that the 100% membership of all SLPs in the Philippines as a medium-term goal for the association. We have been steadily increasing from the previous years and we would like to continue it with additional support from the possible professionalization/regulatory requirements to practice the profession.


If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

First is to be able to pass the Speech Pathology Act of the Philippines so that we can now be licensed and regulated as profession. Second would be to continue the Bi-Annual National convention which we have started in 2016. Third is to establish and maintain Special interest groups in our different areas of practice of our members in the country. And lastly establish the Philippine Journal of Speech-Language Pathology as a venue for disseminating researches from and in the country.


If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

No.

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Mary Edna Joyce A. Lim, CSP-PASP
PASP Member since 2015


Mary graduated Cum Laude from UP CAMP with a BS Speech Pathology degree in 2015.  She is also a member of the International Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi.

She is currently a consultant Speech-Language Pathologist at Therapeutic Intervention for Kids and Speech Clinic, both in Quezon City.

She continues to advance herself professionally by attending certification courses and seminars such as The Science of LSVT LOUD and LSVT BIG as well as being trained in PROMPT Level 1.

In Mary’s view, serving in the PASP is her means of personally “giving back” to a fulfilling profession as well as a way to improve the status of both the Filipino SLP and the clients they serve.  She envisions a more dynamic continuing education program consisting of small-group discussions, seminars, and workshops that would update members on the latest studies and intervention techniques and promote high-quality standards of practice.


Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

I am passionate about the profession. Since I entered speech pathology in college, I have devoted most of my time and energy on improving my craft to develop my professional growth and, more importantly, to serve my patients better. But now that I am offered this valuable opportunity to serve the organization, I would like to give back to the profession that has been more than fulfilling and has made me a better person in so many ways. I would like to do my part and offer my services to continue the progress that the organization has achieved over the years. I believe that further developing the practice of speech pathology in the country would benefit, not only the members of the organization, but above all, the patients that we serve. I am aware that being a PASP Officer would demand a huge amount of my time and energy, but this is an opportunity to serve persons with disabilities on a larger scale. This is a challenging endeavor I am willing to undertake for the people that matter the most.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

I have a strong and consistent work ethic. I take my responsibilities seriously and I always give my best in everything that I do. When I commit to a task, I do whatever it takes to deliver. I always start my tasks as soon as possible so that I have enough time to work on it and produce quality outputs, and meet the deadlines.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

I am passionate about continuing education because the profession is constantly evolving. It is crucial to keep the members of the organization updated about the latest studies and intervention techniques in speech-language pathology to promote high-quality standards of practice and to provide the service that our patients deserve. This can be done by coordinating with key people and organizations to arrange small group discussions, seminars, and workshops such as PROMPT. Publicizing offerings of certification courses from CAMP such as AAC, Dysphagia, and Aphasia courses would also encourage furthering of education and specializations.


If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

By the end of the 2018-2019 term, I hope our team has achieved (1) a number of continuing education programs; (2) significant progress on, if not completion and implementation of, the SP bill; (3) public awareness seminars for parents, caregivers, and other interested individuals; and (4) regular general assemblies of the association.


If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

Yes. Realistically, there are a lot of unpredictable occurrences that may hinder me from attending a board meeting or participating in other activities or events. However, I assure (the association) that I will do my best to perform my duties.


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Bea Angela T. Lozada, CSP-PASP
PASP Member since 2015


Bea graduated in 2015 with a Bachelor of Science in Speech Pathology degree from the University of the Philippines Manila.  She is currently a consultant speech-language pathologist at Communicare Therapy Center for Children in Parañaque City and KidSpeak Therapy in Las Piñas City.

She continues to advance herself professionally by attending certification courses and seminars such as The Science of LSVT LOUD and LSVT BIG as well as being trained in PROMPT® Level 1. Bea recently received her AAC Specialist certification from UP-CAMP and TINIG-AAC Project.

Bea sees serving in the PASP as an opportunity to develop her leadership skills as well as an avenue for her advocacy for the profession. She recognizes the lack of awareness of the profession, limited accessibility to services, and lukewarm membership participation as the key issues hounding the PASP today.  Bea recommends a strong SLP profession advocacy campaign, community outreach, social media communications, and inter organizational collaborations to address these issues. 


Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

Leadership and service have always been my passion, and thankfully I have been given many opportunities to lead and serve various groups and organizations -- from being an officer of my high school classes, block head of my undergraduate class, to head coordinator of the youth group of my church.  I believe that extending my service to PASP will provide me not only a new opportunity to demonstrate my leadership skills, but also an avenue to reach out to my fellow SLPs and advocate for our beloved profession.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

Planning and organization skills.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

Some of the key issues I have identified and the corresponding action plans that I believe can help address them are as follows:

Key Issues:

  • Lack of awareness of the profession and its value
  • Lack of accessibility to speech-language therapy services
  • Lack of engagement by other speech pathologists in PASP activities

 

Possible Plans of Action:

  • Develop a strong advocacy campaign on the value of speech-language therapy
  • Reach out to communities who have limited access to and may potentially benefit from speech therapy and offer free screening and therapy services
  • Provide talks/seminars to stakeholders such as parents, teachers, caregivers
  • Promote the value of speech therapy by documenting testimonials of parents or students who benefited or have been helped by speech therapy
  • Utilize social media for sharing infographics, photos/videos, and other documents that would help advocate and spread important information about speech-language therapy
  • Establish partnerships with allied professions or groups such as Pediatric Neurodevelopmental Specialists, Special Education Practitioners, Autism Society of the Philippines, etc.


If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

By the end of my term, I hope to achieve the following:

  • Increased number and better engagement of active PASP members
  • Increased awareness about the SLP Profession
  • Heightened interest in speech-language therapy
  • Improved access to speech-language therapy
  • Stronger partnerships forged with organizations/communities for advocacy, awareness campaigns and free therapy
  • Create more projects and activities for PASP members’ gathering (e.g. general assemblies, fund-raising events, volunteer programs)

If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

No.


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Viannery D. Mabag, CSP-PASP
PASP Member since 2013


Viannery received her BS Speech Pathology degree from the University of the Philippines Manila in 2013.  She is a faculty member of the Department of Speech-Language Pathology at the Cebu Doctors’ University College of Rehabilitative Sciences where she also serves as the SLP clinical training coordinator and as an SLP research mentor.

Also a practicing clinician, Viannery works with clients at Buildabilities Inc. in Cebu City and at iLearn Educational Center in Cagayan de Oro City. Personal advocacies and areas of interest within the profession also led her to actively volunteer with Operation Smile Philippines and Bobath Pilipinas.

She continues to advance herself professionally by attending certification courses and seminars such as PROMPT® Level 1 and Bobath Pediatric Basic Certification. At the moment, Viannery is working on her Master’s degree in Teaching Medically-Related Subjects (MA-TMRS) at the Cebu Doctors’ University.

She hopes to serve the PASP as liaison to empower SLP members outside the National Capital especially in the Visayas and Mindanao areas. She also hopes to foster increased participation of our SLP members in less accessible areas by making registration available and affordable to SLP students and making continuing education more accessible by exploiting currently available communications technologies.


Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

Being one of the SLP practitioners based in Vis-Min areas, I have been exposed to how underserved the clients are in these areas and how the meager amount of accessible SLPs do the necessary actions to address this issue. If I become an officer, I can be an integral liaison to empower these SLPs to be more involved in PASP, despite the amount of load and accessibility concerns they may have by being based outside of NCR. As I can relate to the SLPs in the underserved areas in general (both in Vis-Min and those in Luzon, but outside NCR), I have an edge in being able to formulate and implement strategies that are feasible for these SLPs. This way, PASP can be well represented and all the members can be reached out by the organization.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

I am visionary, driven, and fun. Being VISIONARY, I have a clear idea of how PASP will be after 2019, should I become one of the officers. Should I be given a chance, I can visualize more SLPs in the underserved areas not only joining/constantly renewing membership with PASP, but also becoming consistently ACTIVE participants in the organizations’ activities and advocacies. Being DRIVEN, I have the capacity to materialize the visions I have set. Once I set my heart and mind into achieving something, I employ all my resources, connections, and ability to engage people to help out in order to achieve the vision (i.e. CDU SLP Internship, SLP Friendship Day 2017, etc.). Being FUN, I always integrate fresh and exciting ideas to let everything I do engaging and worthwhile for all the people involved in the activity. Should I be given the chance to serve, I will ensure that the PASP officers and PASP members will see enjoyable innovations that will make them want to work more and/or involve themselves more.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

I am very passionate about the amount of participation that the current PASP members have in the organization’s activities (i.e. assemblies, meetings, etc.) and continuing education programs (e.g. seminars, conferences, etc.). I can see that despite the increasing membership rate (as presented from a recent registration rate infographic released by PASP last May 30, 2017), not all of these members are actively involved in the activities. With around 452 registered members, the amount of participants showing up on the events are not always consistent. During the National Convention held last July 23-24, 2016, I observed that a lot of PASP members participated and supported the event. However, I noticed that this level of participation was not consistent across all the other activities held before and after that event. Based on experience, I am aware that some members do not get to attend events due to accessibility issues, as most of the PASP activities are held in Manila. The added expenses in traveling, accommodation, etc., further limits participation. To address this concern, I propose to organize and hold seminars, assemblies, meetings, and other gatherings in Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao areas simultaneously. For example, if we invite an international speaker to hold a seminar about a specific topic and decides to hold it in Manila, members from Visayas-Mindanao area can gather at a specific venue more accessible to them and “attend” the session through streaming the session from Manila. They still get to participate in the open forum portion and get certificates for participation. This way, they only get to pay the registration fee and not incur additional expenses for airfare and accommodation. Same thing happens if we have an assembly in Cebu, or Bacolod, or Davao for example. Members from the other areas can gather at venues accessible to them, be available at the same time, “attend” the event online, and participate with the activities. This appears to be a lot of work, but given the technological age we are in, this is a direction we should eventually move towards. Given proper planning and designation of manpower, this can be feasible. The LSVT seminar held a year ago where UP and CDU students got to attend through streaming the session online worked successfully with this system. I believe we can adopt this to PASP activities so we can bring the organization closer to all members.

To further PASP’s membership, I would also want to encourage university SLP students to be registered in PASP. Being part of the academe, I am aware that most of my students want to join PASP, but refuse to do so because they could not afford the 500 pesos registration fee or the expenses they would incur should they attend the activities or seminars that are usually held in Manila. For me, encouraging them to participate and ensuring they get positive experiences and maximum benefits from being a part of the organization as early as when they are students guarantee higher chances of them registering as graduate members and eventually certified regular members after they graduate. Right now, the current benefits for student affiliates are access to the website, receiving alerts to seminars and activities, discounts on seminars, profile on the directory, updates on the profession, free access to technical forums of choice, etc. All these, they can get, after registering and paying a yearly fee of 500 pesos. While this amount appears manageable to us professionals, this is not entirely student-friendly. I suggest lowering the student affiliate fee to 50-100 pesos and adding further benefits like free access to not just technical forums, but also journals and other published studies that may be helpful with student coursework. To compensate with the amount that the PASP could have from student affiliate registrations, I suggest requiring all registered student affiliate members to collaborate with their student councils in initiating activities in cooperation with PASP. These could be awareness drives, seminars, or other events that could raise funds, while spreading advocacy and knowledge about the profession. The councils can invite different keynote speakers (PASP members, international speakers, etc.) to talk about special topics to the SLP stakeholders. As these activities are in cooperation with PASP and are primarily student council-initiated, PASP does not have to spend on anything or delegate manpower, but may help out the student councils through spreading notifications and announcements to the members. After the programs, part of the revenues earned can be kept by the council, and part would be given to PASP. This way, the student affiliate members get to save on PASP registration fee, but get to “pay” through revenue from the council-initiated activities. PASP, on the other hand, gets to empower the student affiliate members and still get to spread the organizations’ advocacies.


If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

  • At the end of the team’s term, 80-90% of SLP professionals in the Philippines are members of PASP.
  • At the end of the team’s term, 80-90% of SP/SLP students from accredited Philippine SP/SLP schools are members of PASP.
  • At the end of team’s term, 80-90% of the PASP members participate in PASP activities.

Basically, I aim to increase SP/SLP student registration & participation, increase SLP registration, and increase participation of PASP members in less accessible areas.


If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

My current tasks in Cebu may cause conflicts in scheduling of meetings, etc. My academe tasks and clinical tasks may cause conflicts with the scheduling of the regular board meetings. However, I believe that with early scheduling and proper communication, these will all be manageable and conflicts in scheduling can be avoided. If I cannot be physically around during the meetings, I can propose for online meetings (i.e. Skype, etc.), email threads, and other online correspondences to further manage schedule conflicts.


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Christine Medina-Chin, CSP-PASP
PASP Member since 2006


Christine completed her BS Speech Pathology degree from the University of the Philippines Manila in 2003.  She is a full-time faculty member and the pre-professional chair for Academics of the Department of Speech Pathology at the De La Salle Health and Sciences Institute in Dasmariñas City, Cavite. She is also a consultant clinical supervisor for the post-graduate dysphagia course of UP-CAMP.

She provides therapy services to client at Achievers Therapy and Tutorials in Tanza, Cavite and at Comprehensive Therapy Services at the Bautista Hospital in Cavite City both as a practicing speech-language pathologist and in administrative positions.

She has furthered her professional education by finishing the basic course in Health Professions and Normal Language, Neuromotor Speech and Dysphagia courses at UP Manila. She recently completed the Basic Course in Health Professions Education (Curriculum and Instructional Planning Track) at the National Teacher Training Center for Health Professionals, UP-Manila. She is working on her diploma in Health Professions Education in the same institution as an incoming student.

Christine would like to contribute to the growth of the profession by serving in the PASP.  She believes that professional regulation will empower the Filipino SLP and encourage member participation within the association.  She envisions the PASP forming regional chapters to boost camaraderie and professional cooperation. 


Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

I want to be part of a bigger group to contribute to the growth and movement of the profession.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

I am very tenacious when it comes to achieving goals. I also enjoy being around people and collaborating with them. I believe there is so much more that one can learn and keep learning from experiences and from the people that we encounter.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

I believe that the most pressing issue of the profession is the passing of the SP Bill so that the organization can have more jurisdiction over the practice. Hopefully with its passing, it will also encourage members to participate more and become more active in the organization. With the recent developments in the bill, I want to maximize linkages with members of the congress through other members or socio civic groups to ensure that we do not lose the gains that we obtained at the senate. 

Members’ participation is also a concern in PASP. As a resident of the South, I admit that attending General Assemblies in the North can be a stretch for us. A possible solution would be to form chapters in certain areas so that people who are near each other can also meet and be familiar with one another. This will ensure that we can also monitor and assist other members more effectively if needed.

 

If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

  • Establish chapters in key areas of the Philippines to ensure better participation of other members who are located in various locations.
  • Ensure the passing of the SP Bill into Law by determining key people in congress who can be tapped to facilitate the movement of the bill.


If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

Yes. If my husband or daughter would need me or if I have a difficult pregnancy as we are currently trying to conceive.


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Eileen J. Zarraga, CSP-PASP
PASP Member since 2011


Eileen graduated with a BS Speech Pathology degree from the University of the Philippines Manila in 2010.  She took additional units in Aural Rehabilitation in children in 2010-2011 then pursued her graduate studies in Clinical Psychology at the University of the Philippines Diliman in 2012-2015.

As a practicing clinician, Eileen works with clients as a consultant at Core Skills Therapy Center in Quezon City, Center for I.D.E.A.S in Makati City, and Brave Hearts SpEd Center in Butuan City.  She has also volunteered with Operation Smile, at the Veterans Memorial Medical Center, and at TheraFree activities.

She continues to advance herself professionally by attending certification courses and seminars such as PROMPT® Levels 1 and 2, Social Thinking, MNRI Oral-Facial Reflex Integration, and Basic Life Support-CPR, among others.

Eileen hopes to improve SLP service delivery especially to far-flung areas of the country.  She also sees the PASP holding regular conventions and continuing education activities in the near future. Eileen recognizes the importance of membership accessibility and communication and would also like to continue in pushing for the Speech Pathology bill.


Why do you want to serve as a PASP Officer?

Before accepting the nomination, I had to thoroughly think about what being a PASP Officer would demand of me and if I can commit to it and sustain it for two years because in my case, this is voluntary work on top of being a full-time SP Clinician. By accepting the nomination and deciding to be a candidate, serving as a PASP Officer goes beyond interest. I had to go back to what kept me going as a speech-language pathologist, and that’s essentially to be of service. Because I find joy and meaning to what I do and by sharing my work to other people, hopefully we could endeavor, not just to develop our profession and our association more, but to empower the people and the families we work with. Moreover, it is for consistency. I like to believe that I’m an advocate of the profession. It would not be consistent of me to pass up this opportunity knowing that someone believed enough in me to nominate me as a candidate. I just know that I would regret passing up the opportunity to be of service and to advocate the profession within our own association.


What is your strongest trait that will benefit the association and profession as one of the 2018-2019 PASP Officers? 

Over the years of my practice, I’ve valued knowledge and skills, which is why I try to the best of my ability, to hone my skills and learn more about the practice by attending various seminars and workshops. My passion for learning has not ceased however, I’ve also come to realize that there is only so much I can do alone. I am limited on my own and I can accomplish more when I work in a team. I believe that I’m a good team player and that I possess the traits that will enable me to not just lead as a possible PASP officer but also to work harmoniously with the team. Being nominated as a candidate also showed me that a colleague sees me as someone who is responsible, dependable and trustworthy.


What are some of the current issues faced by the organization and the profession that you are passionate about? Please indicate some possible plan of actions that you would want to implement to address these issues. 

I’ve been flying for several years now to provide speech-language services to places where our services have not yet reached. There are still a lot of provinces that are in need of our services. We can replicate what we are presently doing and reach out to centers that can partner up with the association and/or professional so that we could provide quality service with affordable rates. It would also be good to get in touch with SP professionals who would like to work in their own provinces.

I would also like to push through with the SP Bill to help with the regulation and protection of our members. Although I understand that the future of the bill is already at the hands of our lawmakers, we could still regularly contact their offices to update us or remind them about our pending bill.

With regards to members’ participation, I believe we are on the right track in requiring members to attend continuing education seminars and workshops to renew their membership. Although we could also inject a bit of fun by giving away some freebies during meetings if our budget allows.


If elected to be a PASP Officer, list some specific goals that you want your team to achieve at the end of your term. 

Although our population is still small as compared to the population of people we serve, I would like to believe that we can expand our services to more regions so that more people can have access. I would also like to continue the national convention that was started in 2016 and have another one within 2018-2019. It would be a great avenue to update ourselves of our current status as a professional and as an association. Honestly, I am quite happy with how the outgoing officers has set the pace with regards to the future of the association and would like to continue what they have started and/or strengthened such as regular continuing education programs made possible by inviting professionals outside the country and by collaborating with the universities offering the SP Program, a more accessible way of making contact with the PASP officers and its members through having a centralized member database and online website, and pushing through with the SP Bill.



If elected, do you know of any reasons whatsoever why you will not be able to attend regular board meetings, participate fully or otherwise fulfill your responsibilities as a PASP Officer?

Yes. At the moment, I fly once a month to Butuan City as a consultant speech language pathologist. If for any reason, a board meeting might fall on those days, I will not be physically present but I will make sure that my responsibilities will be met before the board meeting.


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